Leslie S Pratch pic

Effective Human Capital Management Yields Results

Leslie S Pratch pic

Leslie S Pratch
Image: pratchco.com

Author and businesswoman Leslie Pratch has dedicated her career to understanding and assessing leadership qualities in executives. In an article for the European Financial Review entitled “Serious Human Capital Management for Seriously Good Performance,” Leslie Pratch discusses the necessity for private equity firms to monitor their leadership teams as closely and carefully as they do other aspects of their companies. Knowing the CEO and all the people who report to him or her can help avert disasters down the line and also can positively impact returns.

For some firms, the article recommends hiring a part-time human capital advisor. The person in this position “gets to know the managers, and with them, conducts a structured analysis of their jobs. With the manager, the advisor identifies key targets and metrics and documents the relationships that will be crucial for the manager’s success.” With the help of data from psychological assessments, the advisor focuses on building relationships, developing managers, and helping the investors achieve their goals.

Leslie S Pratch pic

How Experience May Not Tell the Whole Story of a Job Applicant

Leslie S Pratch pic

Leslie S Pratch
Image: pratchco.com

As founder and CEO of Pratch & Company, Leslie Pratch helps investors, management committees, and company boards assess potential candidates based on psychological resources and personality strengths. In a recent article for The European Financial Review, Leslie Pratch explained how assessments can detect personality traits that impact leadership abilities that may not be evident by looking at a resume.

The article demonstrates the value of assessments by sharing the example of a CEO named Jack, a successful corporate attorney who was heading a start-up in a fragmented distribution industry. While Jack had experience, assessments found that he had a reactive and avoidant coping style that was likely to undermine his effectiveness as a leader. Pratch explains: “This passive coping compromises the quality of his judgment to the point that would put the venture at risk. Unfortunately, the issues most likely to make his business successful … are precisely the issues likely to bring out his passive coping.”