Systematically Get The Evidence You Need

man sitting at desk looking at group of arguing people

By Leslie S. Pratch

The last two posts, we’ve looked at an approach to assessing portfolio company managers efficiently during due diligence. To evaluate portfolio company managers, you need evidence that demonstrates they have or lack the necessary competencies. Interviews and reference checks are the main tools available during due diligence to see if the managers have the skills you’ve defined in your competency framework. During due diligence, it’s important to learn both what an executive has accomplished and how. To do so, you must evaluate the personal characteristics, skills, knowledge, experience and attitudes used to achieve results and consider these factors against the criteria you identified for successful performance.

COMPETENCY FRAMEWORK UNDERPINS INTERVIEW GUIDE

A competency framework provides guidelines and interview prompts to help you collect evidence. A deal team can use a framework to identify the most important competencies for the role, define those competencies operationally, develop questions to ask in an interview and know how to evaluate the answers. Good questions will provide evidence of behaviours that indicate the competency. You’ll validate what you hear by drilling down with questions about the time the behaviour was displayed such as: what was your role, what were you thinking, what did you say and do, what was the outcome.

The deal team can craft an interview guide that defines each competency, provides both positive and negative examples of behavioural indicators for each competency, and offers questions designed to elicit evidence of the candidate’s historic demonstration of the competency.

What are you looking for in the interview?

Before you conduct an interview, establish the areas you will probe. For example, competencies required of a CEO might include a subset of the following high-level competencies:

 

Your value creation plan dictates the performance criteria for each management role. For instance, if negotiating skills are vital, ask the candidate to recount a time he or she applied these skills either successfully or unsuccessfully. Probing areas of poor performance and lack of success is important to understand how the candidate copes with setbacks and defeats, and whether he or she learns from failures and grows through adversity.

Probing for Strategic Leadership competency

Portfolio company CEOs almost always need to be competent at Strategic Leadership, which can be operationally defined as:

  • Defines the enterprise’s basic long term goals and objectives and acts and allocates the resources to carry out these goals.
  • Identifies conflicts among goals and considers tradeoffs and the time horizons in making decisions
  • Identifies how specific decisions will lead to specific outcomes
  • Leads by example and motivates others to follow.

As investors, you know how to ask questions related to strategic leadership. You might consider adding questions like:

  • What do you want important subordinates as well as outsiders to understand in your business? How do you bring about that understanding?
  • What are your staff’s main worries? What have you done about them?
  • When you have to tackle a complex problem for the first time how do you approach it? Walk me through a specific example.
  • Describe a situation when you solved a problem or clarified an issue that others could not.

Positive and negative behavioural indicators help you evaluate the degree to which the manager you have interviewed is capable in this area:

When the interview is over

After the interview, compare your notes to the interview guide, indicate positive and negative indicators demonstrated by the candidate, identify specific supporting comments, and rate the candidate.

Also note your overall impressions of the candidate, both as a person and as an executive. Can you see yourself working with this person? Can you imagine this person working well with key investors, founders, and other important subordinates? The answers to these question will go a long way to determining whether the person will be a successful addition to your executive team or not.

WHAT HAPPENS AFTER YOU BUY/ HIRE?

You can use the performance criteria you’ve established and what you’ve learned in the interview to guide how you build and support a new investment’s management team and the resources and support you provide to it. Next week we’ll look at ways to monitor the management team and measure performance against the value creation drivers for the deal.

A version of this piece appeared in The European Financial Review.


About the Author

Leslie S. Pratch is the founder and CEO of Pratch & Company. A clinical psychologist and MBA, she advises private equity investors, management committees and Boards of Directors of public and privately held companies whether the executives being considered to lead companies possess the psychological resources and personality strengths needed to succeed. In her recently published book, Looks Good on Paper? (Columbia University Press, 2014), she shares insights from more than twenty years of executive evaluations and offers an empirically based approach to identify executives who will be effective within organisations — and to flag those who will ultimately very likely fail — by evaluating aspects of personality and character that are hidden beneath the surface.

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Getting Systematic about Management Assessments

By Leslie S. Pratch

When you’re acquiring a company or building a management team, assessing skilled managers effectively can lead to improved ROI. Private equity investors can do more to achieve sustained success by making the process as systematic, rigorous, and efficient as possible. Having a system in place to guide judgments about management talent can add value.

A systematic process can have different roles for different team members at different stages in the deal:

A competency model outlines the behaviours that a firm’s managers should demonstrate as leaders. Competency models are based on the critical elements of accurate job descriptions and are the foundation of most systems for assessing managers.

In this letter, I’ll describe the first step: crafting the position description, which is the basis for the competency model and the assessment. In future letters, I’ll outline how to create the competency model and how to use it wisely.

DEVELOPING POSITION TEMPLATES

Begin by developing a position template. You and your firm undoubtedly have had some discussion of the position. Typically, a template includes:

1. Business Context

What is the strategy and what is the business model?

2. Critical Business Imperatives

What are the priority activities necessary to realise the strategy/objectives, and how will culture inform the execution of strategy?

  • The current and future nature of the team. What type of person would best complement the existing team? How should the team evolve?
  • The most important activities the company must do to realise the strategy (e.g., closing a major account, developing a major OEM partnership, completing a critical product development, or building the organisation).
  • The culture of the organisation. What are the organisation’s values? Management style, communications, and approach to training and development of people?

3. The Job

  • Job title and purpose.
  • Dimensions: budgets, people, materials, capital investment and key result areas.
  • Nature and scope and in particular, the difficulties and challenges in doing the job well.
  • Key relationships, both internal and external
  • Principal accountabilities: what are the two or three key objectives and the job’s expected contribution to the organisation; what is most important to the organisation from this position?
  • Performance measures related to the critical business objectives.
  • Time-span horizon of the role (how long it will take to achieve the longest task in the role).

4. The Person

What is the definition of the ideal candidate? Characteristics might include functional/ professional/ technical skills, work experience, career flow, prior level of performance desired, and key required competencies.

The ideal candidate definition is specific to a specific job at a specific portfolio company at a specific moment. The two or three principal accountabilities or tasks the jobholder needs to perform in order to be considered successful drive this definition. For example, what behaviours, actions, and contributions would a high-performing jobholder make in carrying out these critical tasks? Finally, what are the competencies associated with these successful behaviours, actions, and contributions?

WHO SHOULD DEVELOP POSITION DESCRIPTIONS?

Members of the deal team most closely involved with articulating the company’s strategy and overseeing its implementation should develop the position template, possibly assisted by a competent HR person and/or operating partner within the firm. If the deal team uses third party consultants to provide expertise in the market or industry that the deal team lacks, then those experts should be involved too.

WHAT ARE THE TRICKY BITS TO BE SURE TO GET RIGHT?

  • Be specific and real. Start with the leadership challenges implied by the strategy. Focus your assessment of management capability during due diligence on what the management team needs to achieve. Link the position description tightly to what you actually need managers to do well — the critical business imperatives of the role — in order to carry out the strategy. Anticipate what might get in the way to achieving the position objectives.
  • Don’t be too specific. It’s easy to get carried away with making things too specific and while there’s no constant definition of what’s too specific, you want to focus on the critical “what’s” that must happen while not specifying the “how” in inordinate detail.
  • Don’t forget culture. Take culture into account. If you plan to change the company’s corporate mindset as part of the strategy, the CEO’s job description should include shaking up the organisation and its bureaucracy quickly and deeply and probably taking other necessary, aggressive steps.
  • Write position descriptions that can serve as the basis for position scorecards once you own the company. You may be planning to use financial or other performance indicators as part of determining compensation and bonuses. More specific performance measures that measure success at moving the company closer to achieving the strategy are valuable to monitor progress, and if you think about them as you write the position description you won’t need to get outside help after the deal closes to put these metrics together.
  • Think through how long the person has to achieve each performance measure. Is a key item to be achieved in three months or within a year?

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?

After you have the position description, you can easily model the competencies for position. The competency model translates the requirements of the position into the set of skills you want to be sure the candidate has and suggests the indicators you can look for that will indicate that he/she has the skills.

In future posts, I’ll look at competency models and putting them to use.


A version of this piece appeared in The European Financial Review

About the Author

Leslie S. Pratch is the founder and CEO of Pratch & Company. A clinical psychologist and MBA, she advises private equity investors, management committees and Boards of Directors of public and privately held companies whether the executives being considered to lead companies possess the psychological resources and personality strengths needed to succeed. In her recently published book, Looks Good on Paper? (Columbia University Press, 2014), she shares insights from more than twenty years of executive evaluations and offers an empirically based approach to identify executives who will be effective within organisations — and to flag those who will ultimately very likely fail — by evaluating aspects of personality and character that are hidden beneath the surface.

How to Avoid an Ugly Mess

 

 

How to Avoid an Ugly Mess

By Leslie S. Pratch

Not every management assessment is the same. Picking the right assessment approach could mean the difference between having an outstanding investment return and having to explain an ugly mess to your partners. Different options answer different questions, so you need to figure out what you most want to learn.

What you might like to know

Has he done it before?

This question is good to ask when you know what you want and are sure it isn’t going to change. A good way to answer this question is with a talent and skill assessment. Search firms, many assessment firms, and many psychologists focus on past achievements. They document if the “candidate has done it before in a compelling fashion”. Typically, they use behavioural interviewing to understand how and when the candidate has “done it before”.

If you plan to exit the deal in three to five years, and know that the company won’t change and the world won’t change in that interim, and that there will be no unexpected opportunities and no unexpected problems, then this could be a good approach — for your needs.

How will he cope with change?

Will he capitalise on opportunity? Can he do something no one has ever done? How much do you care about how well the candidate will perform under new or unexpected conditions? You can pick someone who seems like he fits the bill but the world changes for better or worse. When it changes for the worse, you see how adaptable he is. But you may not know when it changes for the better, because the executive doesn’t take advantage of the change until the competition does.

In faster-moving or more uncertain markets, expecting the unexpected makes sense. You need someone with skills but ability to cope — which requires raw cognitive capability and a stable information-seeking personality much more than specific pre-defined skills — is also critical. Talent and skill assessments don’t address these at all. An approach aimed at understanding active coping capabilities as they will be needed for the business challenge fits well here.

How can you get the most of the executive?

Sometimes a candidate brings a lot but isn’t perfect. That introduces the other party in the interaction — you. How can you act so you capitalise on the executive’s strengths and proactively protect against his weaknesses as a leader? Talent and skill assessments won’t shed any light here; Pratchco’s approach to understanding personality as part of the assessment will.

How will he cope in a private equity environment?

The pace is fast and CEOs have to cope with having investors challenging their thinking. If they’ve been in a private equity environment in the past and you know the investors they worked with before, a talent assessment is adequate. If they’ve never been in a private equity environment or you don’t know the other investors, you should use Pratchco.

Are incumbents worth keeping, even though the strategy is changing?

You are inheriting a management team. They know the business and losing them would be a big loss. But they haven’t done what is being called for next, even if they thought of it (similar to founders’ problem with startup), so they will all fail a simple talent assessment. But they might very well be keeping if you could supplement them with your skills or add a team member at the right time. If you assume they can’t do it, you will have to hire a new team, which will lack the understanding of the company the original team had.

What’s in it for the executive?

Executives don’t generally relish the opportunity to be assessed. Putting them through a painful assessment that provides no value to them won’t be a great way to start a relationship and might even be a way to end one.

Talent and skill assessments document what the executive says and usually provide no value to the executive. Assessments that find underlying themes can help executives understand themselves better and can provide guidance that the executives can use to improve how they interact with others (including but not limited to you).


A version of this post appeared in The European Financial Review

About the Author

Leslie S. Pratch is the founder and CEO of Pratch & Company. A clinical psychologist and MBA, she advises private equity investors, management committees and Boards of Directors of public and privately held companies whether the executives being considered to lead companies possess the psychological resources and personality strengths needed to succeed. In her recently published book, Looks Good on Paper? (Columbia University Press, 2014), she shares insights from more than twenty years of executive evaluations and offers an empirically based approach to identify executives who will be effective within organisations — and to flag those who will ultimately very likely fail — by evaluating aspects of personality and character that are hidden beneath the surface.

Serious Human Capital Management for Seriously Good Performance

Choice of the personnel

HR contemplating where to put the employee.

By Leslie Pratch

Private equity firms develop financial and strategic plans and manage their portfolio companies by them. But most private equity firms are more casual about avoiding human capital disasters, and very casual about ensuring the best results form human capital. Portfolio companies are generally left alone to manage their own leadership issues until problems show up — and they will.

Some larger firms have realised that unthinkingly ignoring human capital issues until there’s a big problem is a strategy for having big problems. Doing nothing and then having a problem 18 months later seems like a poor idea. In response, some larger firms have recently decided to use an outside consultant to deal with human capital or have hired an internal staff member to oversee management recruitment and to otherwise support portfolio companies on matters related to traditional human resources functions.

You need to know what’s happening with your key managers. Good private equity firms can earn even better returns by having someone know all the people who report to the CEO in a portfolio company and how they work together.

It’s not voluntary to give quarterly numbers, it’s not voluntary to discuss the strategy, and it’s not voluntary to be able to talk intelligibly about the status of your top management teams. Your standard operating procedure should be poking your noses into how your CEOs work with their management teams. Just as you don’t stop assessing the leading indicators of profit and cash flow, you should not suspend HR diligence after the deal is done.

Medium-sized firms also need a methodology to monitor portfolio company talent, and they likely will need help in executing it.

A Part-time Human Capital Advisor is the Right Solution for Certain Firms

A part-time human capital advisor can track the status of management teams on an ongoing basis and also be a resource to address situations before they deteriorate and cause financial damage. A part-time human capital advisor may be the best answer for any medium-sized firm with aggressive timetables and financial goals, a history of surprise poor performance by CEOs, and/or little knowledge about the portfolio company management teams and what’s happening in them. It can also be a great solution for some larger firms. It may be right for your firm if you are:

  1. A medium-sized firm that makes control investments in growth companies, investments in distressed situations, or buyouts
  2. A large buyout firm that does not do in-house assessments of CEO candidates
  3. A firm with a history of replacing CEOs post-close and of being surprised by poor CEO performance
  4. A firm that needs better knowledge about portfolio company management teams

Someone who has taken the time to know investors’ value creation plan can be positioned as management’s advisor whose role is to help the portfolio company management succeed in carrying out the strategy.

What a Good Human Capital Advisor Actually Does

A good human capital advisor gets to know the managers, and with them, conducts a structured analysis of their jobs. With the manager, the advisor identifies key targets and metrics and documents the relationships that will be crucial for the manager’s success. Together, the advisor and manager make plans for building and measuring the progress of those relationships, especially the manager’s relationships with investors, Board, key customers, and key team members. Having assessed the baseline of each relationship and developed a plan for each relationship, the advisor then monitors the manager’s progress on the plan in the context of the business as it evolves.

If the advisor has done a thorough psychological assessment of the manager (typically as part of due diligence or just after the deal closes) the advisor starts with an enormous understanding of how the manager’s mind functions and how to be most effective in helping him or her change; the advisor understands where and why resistance arises for that person and therefore has a better chance of avoiding it.

An advisor focuses on how people interact. But just as a good CFO assesses progress and thinks about the business with a focus on finance but does not limit him/ herself to finance, so a good human capital advisor helps investors and CEOs assess progress and think about the business with a focus on key relationships and the functioning of its top managers but does not limit him/ herself to this perspective.

An advisor works all sides of each relationship. The advisor identifies a problem and then considers which behavior changes, by whom, would be the easiest route to the solution. Sometimes it’s the CEO who must change, but often the Board or investors can slightly adjust their own behavior and therefore remove or minimize the problem.

An advisor brings independent judgment and experience to bear on the business situation as a whole and to the challenges that the manager faces. The advisor’s goal is the successful achievement of investors’ goals. At the same time, though, the advisor facilitates the development of the manager’s capabilities, so to the manager the advisor may feel or seem more like a coach.

Deliverables

The start-up phase of this service can include assessments, regular discussions with the CEO and/ or CEO and management team members, and then twice yearly Board updates with or without the CEO.

Benefits

This kind of advising/human capital monitoring leads to better solutions and more successful execution, and to problems not occurring even when things appear to be going well. It leads to the advisor’s being able to find problems as they arise and spot patterns that are important for investors to know.


A version of this piece was published in The European Financial Review

About the Author

Leslie S. Pratch is the founder and CEO of Pratch & Company. A clinical psychologist and MBA, she advises private equity investors, management committees and Boards of Directors of public and privately held companies whether the executives being considered to lead companies possess the psychological resources and personality strengths needed to succeed. In her recently published book, Looks Good on Paper? (Columbia University Press, 2014), she shares insights from more than twenty years of executive evaluations and offers an empirically based approach to identify executives who will be effective within organisations — and to flag those who will ultimately very likely fail — by evaluating aspects of personality and character that are hidden beneath the surface.

 

 

Leslie Pratch, Ph.D. – Good on Paper

CEO of Pratch & Company, Leslie Pratch, Ph.D., specializes in assessing candidates for senior leadership roles in organizations, public and private. She is presently writing a book, provisionally entitled LOOKS GOOD ON PAPER, to be published in March, 2014 by Columbia University Press.

Leslie Pratch emphasizes that it is not enough to assess the candidate in the abstract. It is also important to try to get some sense of what new problems might face the business so that the assessment can focus on the qualities needed to cope with those kinds of problems. For example, George Fisher had been an outstanding leader at Motorola. He seemed an ideal candidate to reposition Kodak from film-based to full-spectrum-imaging technology. But he failed to grasp that the shift to digital imaging would make the manufacture and production of paper and film obsolete. Leslie Pratch’s assessment might have predicted that his self-confidence included a blind spot to the scale of disruptive technological change.

To evaluate leadership potential, a psychological assessment works hand in hand with insightful business analysis. Assessing a candidate begins by understanding the situation in which the executive is expected to perform. For this insight her principal source is the client, along with her own research into the industry, the company, customers, and competition.

It is possible to predict, at least much of the time, how an executive will cope with unexpected complexities and changes. For this, Leslie Pratch does not rely on a model that seeks to explain a wide variety of situations in general, one-size-fits-all terms. She does not seek to establish the average effect of one powerful variable on a large set of companies. Rather than establish the average effect, she seeks to tailor-make a fit.

Just as investors evaluate a company to understand the underlying basis for its earnings growth, Leslie Pratch assesses an executive to predict his potential to grow and perform in a specific role. Identifying a candidate’s coping style forms the core of her evaluation process, but not the full extent. The comprehensive predictive model she has developed takes into account the interactions of the executive, the corporate strategy, and the operating environment. Each situation is unique, but knowing the effects of each component with a high degree of detail strengths her ability to predict whether executives will perform as required.

Leslie Pratch developed her psychological model of leadership by by studying the theories behind the concept of active coping and the qualities required for effective leadership. She thought about what effective leaders did, felt, and thought; why they behaved as they did, why they made the decisions they made, and why those actions were effective—or not. She condensed these thoughts and theories to create her personal definition: leadership is effective when it influences the actions of followers toward the achievement of the goals of the group or organization.
With this definition, Leslie Pratch identified four elements of the active coping style that underpin effective leadership: integrity, psychological autonomy, integrative capacity, and catalytic coping.